Friday, March 24, 2017

European Young Leaders, Lisbon, March 2017

Last week I spoke on a panel about Brexit at the European Young Leaders gathering in Lisbon. Joining me on the panel were Owen Jones and Denis MacShane. Pictures here, c/o Friend of Europe.





Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Lisbon LSE Alumni talk

Below are a few pictures of my talk last Thursday to the LSE Alumni group in Lisbon. Thanks to Emanuel (British Council) and Robert (LSE Alumni group) for setting this up and providing the pictures.





The Political Economy of Brexit

I have a chapter in the soon to be published 'The Political Economy of Brexit' edited by David Bailey and Leslie Budd. Further details of the book can be found on the Agenda website:  http://www.agendapub.com/books/political-economy?view=title&id=24


Thursday, March 09, 2017

The 14 Brexit Negotiations, Report from LSE IDEAS

The process of Brexit goes far beyond invoking Article 50. In this Strategic Update, Andrew Hammond and Tim Oliver identify some 14 Brexit negotiations underway - both formal diplomatic discussions and wider debates between and within the UK and EU.

How will these range of negotiations bring the EU centre stage, and do they point towards a 'hard exit' for the UK?   



Wednesday, March 08, 2017

Speaking to the LSE Alumni Group, Lisbon, 16 March

I'll be speaking to the LSE Alumni group in Lisbon in the evening of 16 March. Details below. 

Notes from Brexit Island, a public lecture
Dr Tim Oliver 

British Council, Lisbon  
Thursday March 16th at 19h00 

Dr Tim Oliver is the Dahrendorf Fellow for Europe-North American relations at LSE IDEAS and a Teaching Fellow at UCL. The opinions expressed here are his own. His research focuses on UK politics, UK defence and security policy, UK-EU relations, European geopolitics and transatlantic relations. Educated at the University of Liverpool and the LSE, he has worked in the House of Lords, the European Parliament, the German Institute for International and Security Affairs (Berlin), the SAIS Center for Transatlantic Relations, and the RAND Corporation (both in Washington D.C.). He has taught at LSE, UCL and as a Senior Lecturer at the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. He is a non-resident fellow at the SAIS Center for Transatlantic Relations and has been a Visiting Scholar at NYU. 

Address:
British Council
Rua Luís Fernandes, 1 - 3 1249-062 Lisbon
Metro Stop : Rato


Monday, February 27, 2017

Saturday, February 25, 2017

Foreign Policy and Trade under Trump's Presidency: What's Next for the Transatlantic Relations?

Pictures below of last Thursday's event at ULB to discuss 'Foreign policy and trade under Trump's Presidency: What's next for transatlantic relations?' and to promote the Dahrendorf Forum's report 'New Challenges, New Voices: Next Generation Viewpoints on Transatlantic Relations'.









Tuesday, February 21, 2017

My talk last week in Malta

Last week I was very honoured to speak to the LSE alumni group in Malta on the topic of Brexit. Some details of the event can be found here:  https://www.gvzh.com.mt/malta-news/lse-alumni-brexit-lecture/  Many thanks to Andrew Zammit for organising and the support of GVZH Advocates, the Chamber of Advocates and the Institute of the Financial Services Practitioners. 



Sunday, February 19, 2017

Seminar "Foreign Policy and Trade under Trump's Presidency: What's Next for the Transatlantic Relations?"

This coming Thursday the IES at the Free University of Brussels will be hosting a discussion on 'Foreign policy and trade under Trump's Presidency: What's next for transatlantic relations?' I'll be joining a panel to discuss the future and to promote the Dahrendorf Forum's report 'New Challenges, New Voices: Next Generation Viewpoints on Transatlantic Relations' Details below and online (including for registration, here). 



Saturday, February 04, 2017

Fifty Shades of Brexit: Britain’s EU Referendum and its Implications for Europe and Britain

My latest piece on Brexit, published in The International Spectator, the Italian Journal of International Affairs.

Abstract

Britain’s vote to leave the EU has raised more questions than answers, which is ironic given that David Cameron’s aim for the referendum was to settle the European question in British politics. The outcome, which reflected a range of causes, leaves significant uncertainties overhanging UK politics, UK-EU relations and wider European politics. It is likely that the confused outcome of the referendum and the technicalities of Brexit mean that for both the UK and the EU future relations will resemble fifty shades of grey rather than some black and white division of in or out.